Lenovo Has Just Released An Automatic Superfish Removal Tool

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allheart55 (Cindy E)

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Lenovo has released a tool to help users remove Superfish, according to a statement released today by the company.


Superfish is an adware program that was pre-installed on Lenovo's consumer PCs and made users vulnerable to attack. The Superfish bug quickly went from bad to worse yesterday when researchers found and published a password that would allow anyone to unlock the certificate authority and bypass the computer's web encryption. With the password and the right software, a person on the same Wi-Fi network as a bugged Lenovo user could potentially spy on that user, or insert malware into the data stream.

Users need to uninstall Superfish and remove the certificate.

The tool allows users to automatically uninstall the Superfish application and remove the certificate from web browsers, which previously could only be done manually. In the statement, Lenovo said, "We are working with McAfee and Microsoft to have the Superfish software and certificate quarantined or removed using their industry-leading tools and technologies.

This action has already started and will automatically fix the vulnerability even for users who are not currently aware of the problem."

Users with infected computers will need to uninstall Superfish and remove the certificate in order to completely fix the issue. Researcher Filippo Valsorda created this test to show if your computer is infected.

Superfish is present on Lenovo laptops sold between September 2014 and January 2015.

 

Rich-M

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With the amount of those I resold last year I have contacted all my clients and none of them have this onboard. I don't understand why.
 

DSTM

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I would still buy a Lenovo if I needed a new Laptop for my wife, regardless of this recent revelation.
Have a HP which has given no trouble but the screen clarity is terrible, and wouldn't buy another HP.
 
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allheart55 (Cindy E)

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I'm getting ready to replace my husbands laptop for him.

He currently has a Toshiba. Thinking of another Toshiba or a Dell.
 

Rich-M

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Have you all lost your minds? "(Memory is not user replaceable)" You do know what that means right? And that you cannot replace it is only a small part of the problem that creates....OMG $1500 for a laptop with memory built into the motherboard?
Toshiba at one time was top of the hill for laptops and the best you could buy but that ended in around 2005 with their race to the bottom of the barrel with frequency of repair rivaling my personal favorite bottom feeder, "E-Machine".
I also have to marvel at up to $1700 laptops with onboard video?
 

DSTM

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Have you all lost your minds? "(Memory is not user replaceable)" You do know what that means right? And that you cannot replace it is only a small part of the problem that creates....OMG $1500 for a laptop with memory built into the motherboard?
Toshiba at one time was top of the hill for laptops and the best you could buy but that ended in around 2005 with their race to the bottom of the barrel with frequency of repair rivaling my personal favorite bottom feeder, "E-Machine".
I also have to marvel at up to $1700 laptops with onboard video?
We haven't lost our minds, Rich.
If on board video works well, what's the problem.
They do use the latest technology.:)
 

Rich-M

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Price Dougie, price. 98 % of all laptops are onboard video no issue but paying $1600 for a laptop with onboard video, not I!
My real issue is the memory though the video was an after thought.
 

allheart55 (Cindy E)

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I think Rich mostly means the laptops where memory is not user replaceable.

I was actually looking at some cheaper priced Toshiba's from Gary's link that had the Windows 7 downgrade option available.

AND the memory was user replaceable. :D
 

Rich-M

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Exactly Cindy. Memory not replaceable by user means more than you cannot upgrade the memory. If memory is stamped into the motherboard, then if there is a problem with it after 1 year you wind up replacing the motherboard and I would never buy into that situation with all the motherboard issues in laptops as it is now.

The only laptops I see with a good track from Toshiba are the "AMD Vision" series. Those you cannot kill. I would never buy an Intel Toshiba system. But not the ones with stamped processors either as those I would also never buy. Stamping anything into the motherboard only works for the manufacturer.

BTW Cindy I have been selling Lenovo Thinkpads new and refurbished for years and years and only ever had 2 bad ones that were refurbished. But the best that have never had an issue though I didn't sell that many were MSI laptops.
 
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