new build

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 68.0.3440.106
I want to build a VM but my old machine is needs replacing. I think the store to build it may have over sold me. Also if a savings is negligible, I would stick with this. Could you correct any blatant issues please?
Also the warranty states no out of pocket or labor or parts for first year but if I buy a two year I think it applies to that also. I live near MC that is why I chose them. Their parts are Power Spec.
Importantly, Windows is OEM which I am not hot about b/c it can only be used with this machine and if it breaks I am stuck. Is it advisable not to get OEM?
 

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allheart55 (Cindy E)

Administrator
Windows 10
Edge 17.17134
It's a decent build but you could do better for less with an AMD instead of Intel.
An OEM is fine but you won't be able to use it on a different computer if this one fails.
It is tied to the original hardware that it is activated on.
 

Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.0.1
I think many, including yours truly, would argue that going AMD is not "better". That Intel processor provides excellent support for VM environments. Yes, they cost a little more but the fact is, the processor is just one component among many. Going with a less expensive processor of equal capability and quality does not significantly lower the over all costs, especially once you spread those costs over a normal 5-year life expectancy of the computer.

Please note I am not saying Intel is "better" either. I have nothing against AMD and am not "brand loyal" to Intel. I am saying the i7-8700K is a fine, fully capable and reliable processor that will serve you well. And I am saying both makers make excellent processors and no one brand is better than the other.

If one wants to compare processors, pick specific models to compare one-on-one, preferably in a "blind test" to eliminate biases, for it to be a valid comparison. Not entire brands.

***

Windows is OEM which I am not hot about b/c it can only be used with this machine and if it breaks I am stuck.
Not if it "breaks". If your computer goes up in smoke and you need to reinstall Windows as part of a repair process, it is perfectly legal to use the same license again.

What is not legal with an OEM license is using the same OEM license on a "new" computer. Just keep in mind that a new motherboard constitutes a new computer. So "upgrading" a computer with a new motherboard (even because the old board failed) is the same as getting a new computer. And such license transfers are not legal.

So if your current motherboard dies and you have to replace it as part of your repair, that is fine AS LONG AS you replace it with the same brand and model board, or the manufacturer's recommended replacement if the original is no longer available. You cannot use that opportunity to "upgrade" to a higher-end board.

But still, if you can stretch the budget to spring for a full retail, I would consider it. That license is legally transferable, over and over again, to new computers over the coming years AS LONG AS you uninstall it from all previous builds.

***

That EVGA is an excellent PSU but 850 watts is way way WAY overkill! As seen here you could easily get by with a decent 350W supply. This is particularly true since you are using the processor's and motherboard's integrated graphics and not an added graphics card. Note I even padded the results by pushing your CPU to 100% utilization.

I happen to really like EVGA so IMO, that brand is a good choice. One thing I really like about them is they have extremely quiet fans - even when running at full speed! :) But if me, I would go with their 550W or at most, the EVGA 650W Gold which is currently on sale at MC for the nice price of $60. 650W (and even 550W) will give you plenty of headroom should you decide to add a power hungry graphics card some time down the road. You will even have enough head room to add a couple hard drives too (or better yet, SSDs).

Understand power supplies tend to operate most efficiently with a 50 - 70% load. While these "Gold" certified supplies have a relatively "flat" efficiency response curve, a 850W supply with those components will likely be run at less than 30% loads most of the time when they are least efficient. So you will be wasting more money in energy costs.

Note the savings in the purchase price going with the 650W supply will just about pay for the full "retail" license for W10 Pro! :) That's what I would do!
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 68.0.3440.106
I very much appreciate the help and thank you.
I have made the adjustments.
 

Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.0.1
Great! Now I recommend you visit the webpage for you motherboard and download the manual and become familiar with the precautions and locations of the various mounting holes, connectors and components while you wait for delivery. You can do the same with your case manual and power supply.
 

Rustys

Super Moderator
Linux (Ubuntu)
Firefox 61.0
To add what has already been stated here is to invest in some external USB Hard drives to keep backups on.

Remember to properly disconnect them when not backing up.
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 68.0.3440.106
I am sorry I was not clear but they are building this for me.
Also I already have all on two external drives. Too old and too ill to build.
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 68.0.3440.106
@ Digerati regarding the retail Windows Pro if they install it as they were going to do with an OEM, how would you handle the privacy of the key and the price for building and installation.
 

Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.0.1
Not sure what you mean by privacy of the key. If someone else is building this for you, all you can do is trust they will do it right. Note that OEM versions come in several formats from DVD, to downloaded file, to flash drives. But they all come with a unique key that should be handed over to you (with any disk or drive) when you get the computer.

As for price, I charge $100 - $150 to assemble a computer and install Windows. Free if family or friends.
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 69.0.3497.81
I did not realize the key is known to the builder of my PC whether retail or OEM. The only difference is that it can only be used on one machine if OEM, but retail could be used by the builder with another computer. I guess it is a matter of trust. I was going to buy Windows Pro retail and have them install it as the installation of OS and drivers comes with the package.
This store said they will give me a stick with the OS and drivers etc.
The labor price as shown in the attachment is $150.
I am going to go back to the store and change some figures;
I might go with 8 GB RAM instead of 16, PSU 550 Gold not 850, and unsure if I need a cooler. I am not sure if I over did some other specs. I don't game but do other visual things like YouTube so hope the integrated video is sufficient.
I would like Bluetooth, hyper thread, virtualization,WiFi - AC, USB 3, and unsure about a modem as I fax a lot but my printer has a feeble fax feature.
I cannot use virtualization with my old PC and am looking forward to doing that so I hope my specs will allow for that feature with an SSD of 500 GB.
Any corrections would be appreciated . Also I live in Silverspring MD so build it if you like.
 
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Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.1
The builder has the key regardless the type so it is always a matter of trust. The difference is what the "end user" (consumer) does with it.

I would stick with 16GB of RAM.

Since you don't game, you don't need that CPU. Playing YouTube videos takes very little horsepower.

If you fax a lot, you might consider a multi-function printing device. It will have a the necessary phone modem built in.
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 69.0.3497.81
I understand about the key and will stay with the 16 GB of RAM.
Also, I have a printer with fax capabilities I use.

For the processor I guess I should look at an i5 instead of the i7 hoping I still get BT, virtualization, USB 3 WiFi (AC).
Do I have the processor right?
T Y
 

Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.1
Note that most motherboard makers maintain QVLs (qualified vendors lists) for all their boards for both CPUs and RAM. These lists include CPUs and RAM the makers have tested and certify are compatible with that specific board. You should buy a listed CPU. There are too many RAM makers and models for board makers to test and list them all. So you don't have to buy listed RAM but you should buy RAM with the same specs as listed RAM to ensure compatibility.

Your QVLs can be seen here.
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 69.0.3497.81
I tried to use your post to apply it to post 1, both processor and motherboard. I used the link for QVL's.
I certainly wish I had your resources as some of this is too difficult for me. But TY anyway.
 

Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.1
I certainly wish I had your resources as some of this is too difficult for me. But TY anyway.
Remember, Bing and Google are your friends. They are also my major sources of information. The QVLs I linked to are specifically for the ASUS ROG STRIX Z370-E motherboard you listed above.

If you have a question about one of the CPUs listed, plug that CPU into Bing or Google to learn more about it.
 

peterr

Active Member
Windows 10
Chrome 69.0.3497.81
I forget at times to use these resources and do lean on others. Thanks for the reminder. I am getting to it now.
 

Digerati

Active Member
Windows 10
Pale Moon 28.0.1
I've been supporting IS/IT systems since the early 70s. If there is one thing that has remained constant, it is that there is always more to learn, and everything changes (okay, that's two constants! ;)).

So I am always using Bing Google either to learn the facts, or to verify what I think to be fact, still is fact.
 
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