Occasional .Net Framework problem

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #1
Hi,

My system is Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 32bit.

I have noted an error reported by the Windows Event Viewer that appears to relate to the .Net Framework v.4.

This problem seems only to be associated with attempts to install Trusteer Rapport after having had to uninstall it for technical reasons. I have posted about Rapport in this forum before so need to state now that I am not really interested in having it on my system (my bank pushes customers to use it but they have given me assurances that I will not be disadvantaged by not using it). The reason I attempted to start the installation process was to try to discover what was causing the Rapport installer to fail.

I have cleaned all Trusteer references from my system including the registry so that the new installation would be a completely fresh one but the installation fails producing a Windows error message stating Rapport is not working. The Event Viewer flags two errors:

120644 Application Error 03/09/2017 09:04:04 Application Error 100 1000 Chris-PC 0 528 Faulting application name: RpprtSetup.exe, version: 3.5.1804.134, time stamp: 0x59763779 Faulting module name: ole32.dll, version: 6.1.7601.23775, time stamp: 0x58f4db65 Exception code: 0xc0000005 Fault offset: 0x0004af3a Faulting process id: 0x13e4 Faulting application start time: 0x01d3248b1afd9e3d Faulting application path: P:\Downloads\RpprtSetup.exe Faulting module path: C:\Windows\system32\ole32.dll Report Id: 73af87f9-907e-11e7-ab77-002481efc46a

120643 Application Error 03/09/2017 09:04:03 .NET Runtime 0 1026 Chris-PC 0 516 Application: RpprtSetup.exe Framework Version: v4.0.30319 Description: The process was terminated due to an unhandled exception. Exception Info: exception code c0000005, exception address 7711AF3A Stack:


Except on one recent occasion when I used a registry cleaner to search for Trusteer references and remove them (I was very careful as I know use of registry cleaners is not recommended so made sure I had backups including a C: drive image backup on an external drive), no other programs have created similar errors. On this occasion the registry program completed its job including creating a registry backup before any deletion but triggered a similar .net framework error on closing. On a subsequent test, it produced no error.

I have since run a Microsoft .Net framework repair tool which for me was inconclusive and somewhat incomprehensible but I have retained the logfiles etc. that it produced. I can upload these if anyone is interested. However I am having no other problems, not interested in completing a Trusteer Rapport installation and feel that perhaps I should leave things as they are. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 

Tony D

Super-Moderator
Jan 18, 2016
SE Pennsylvania, USA
Admin #2
There are so many lines of code and so many variables between machines and hardware that I find it amazing that most software actually runs. You may be able to research those event errors in an effort to find the root cause. I'd just let it be.

A RAM issue might cause this.
On this occasion the registry program completed its job including creating a registry backup before any deletion but triggered a similar .net framework error on closing. On a subsequent test, it produced no error.
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Found this at http://www.errorlive.com/exception-code-0xc0000005

Error code 0xc0000005 is one of Windows very broad errors. This is because it can be caused by different factors related to an installed program, installed hardware or both. The following are just a few of the many possible causes:
  1. An installed program such as the antivirus program that prevents the smooth start of a program.• Either corrupt or missing hardware drivers.
  2. Incorrect system hardware configuration.
  3. Either low memory or damaged RAM
  4. Virus/Malware infection.
  5. An old program.
  6. Corrupt or damaged system registry files.
  7. Data execution security feature (DEP).

If you really want to investigate, you can start all over with a blank hard drive and install Windows. Then install Trusteer Rapport. See if that works.
 

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #3
Hi Tony,

Thanks for your reply, the helpful comments and the useful link.

I think of the possible causes you listed, low memory probably accounts for the initial registry cleaner error - my system's RAM is only 2 GB but usually adequate for my type of usage; certainly my RAM is not damaged. I don't believe the RAM size limitation is the cause of the Rapport installation problem though; I suspect there is something within the Rapport installer itself as I see no other problems when installing and running other programs. Virus/malware infections seem unlikely as a variety of checks have revealed everything to be clean. Neither do I believe my regular anti-virus program is causing the Rapport problem as it does not report anything although, perhaps, I should investigate that more thoroughly. Rapport has been going a few years but Trusteer should have kept it up to date with Windows developments even if they are somewhat tardy in keeping up with browser updates, so I don't think it falls into the 'old program' category. Running sfc scannow and ChkDsk does not indicate a problem with file corruption or damage so that leaves DEP and incorrect system hardware configuration. The latter appears unlikely considering the lack of problems elsewhere so perhaps I'll investigate DEP first.

Your advice to 'just let it be' (I'm hearing that John Lennon song in my head now) is probably the best bet as I do not intend running Rapport again. I was just a little concerned that there might be an issue with the .net framework 4 but as that does not appear elsewhere, only with the attempts to install Rapport, perhaps it is best to ignore it.

Cheers and thanks again for your interest and help.
 

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #5
Hi Tony,

Thanks for your continuing interest.

My system is 32 bit - I have considered increasing the RAM but as I only get rare problems caused by low resources in my general usage, I've not done that yet. I note your comment about a good RAM test result not necessarily meaning RAM is problem free but, other than the Rapport installation issue, I seem to be able to do all the things I want to on the system. I also use a Puppy Linux live DVD and a Puppy Linux usb memory stick installation on the computer - Puppy Linux loads the operating system into RAM and actually runs quite speedily on my system. Do you think a RAM issue would be expected to show under those circumstances? (I also have an installation of Xubuntu Linux on a memory stick; it's very good but much slower than Puppy but then I don't believe that it loads into RAM so is running entirely from the usb stick.)

For the moment I'm keeping to your original advice, 'just let it be' but I will let you know if I'm brave enough to explore further and find out anything else.

Cheers.
 

Tony D

Super-Moderator
Jan 18, 2016
SE Pennsylvania, USA
Admin #6
Do you think a RAM issue would be expected to show under those circumstances?
RAM can be tricky. Easiest thing to do is swap out the RAM.

I had a computer in here because it was freezing up. I couldn't find anything wrong with the computer. The user then told me that it freezes when he played Spider Solitaire. I played that game and sure enough, the system froze. It turned out to be bad RAM. I did run MEMTEST which only found the bad RAM after running for a few hours and several passes.
 

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #7
Hi Tony,

I ran MemTest 86 v4.20 from my UBCD v5.11 live CD for six and a quarter hours yesterday. In that time it completed 13 passes each involving 8 different tests. It found no errors. By then it was past my bedtime and I don't normally leave my system on over night so I called it a day. Hopefully, although I realise it is not absolutely conclusive, a RAM problem is less likely.
 

plodr

Active Member
Oct 3, 2016
USA
#8
I go to Aaron Stebner for anything pertaining to NET framework. (I don't have anything above NET 3.5 SP1 on three of the four Windows 7 computers in the house). Unfortunately the Win 7 with NET 4.5.2 is a 64 bit, not a 32 bit.

First run the NET framework Verification tool to be sure the NET framework versions on the computer are okay
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/as...ramework-setup-verification-tool-users-guide/

Is this the repair tool that you ran?
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30135
 

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #9
Hi plodr,

Thank you for your helpful contribution.

I do know about Aaron Stebner - when Windows XP was still supported I had regular .net framework problems after Windows updates on my XP system. It didn't happen every month but was a fairly frequent occurrence and the Aaron Stebner software invariably came to my rescue.

The repair tool I ran was indeed the one you mention. I don't think it actually found anything to repair when I ran it.

Thanks for the link to the .net framework verification tool. I downloaded it, ran it and am pleased (and relieved) that all was OK.

I note, in research on the internet that there has been at least one other recent report of Rapport having a problem with the .network. The problem was not exactly like mine in that I was trying to do a fresh installation of Rapport after completely removing it whereas, as far as I can gather, the complainant had his problem with running Rapport actually installed. he said that Trusteer now recognised there was a problem and 'a fix would be released in a future update' (where have I heard that before?). Whether the fix will cure the installer problem or not is another question - I'll probably not bother with Rapport again after my Bank's reassurances that it is not an obligatory requirement of using their online services.
 

plodr

Active Member
Oct 3, 2016
USA
#10
At least you know there is nothing wrong with your installed versions of NET framework.

I've read many posts of problems with the Trusteer Rapport program. Enough that I think it is not ready for prime time! I'm glad none of the banks I access online requires it.
 

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #11
Yes, that .net framework verification verification tool you suggested proved very useful and reassuring.

As for Trusteer Rapport, well its been available for a few years now so its about time its developers got their act together. Despite the numerous problems it has caused over the years, many banks still push it. My own bank does but at least now I have been given written assurances that, by not using it, I will not be disadvantaged in my dealings with the bank if my account should be compromised (as long as I've not been stupid in revealing my PIN or password to a third party of course). The big annoyance now is that, when I log in to my account, a nag screen appears advising customers to use Rapport - closing the screen is simple enough but there is no way of indicating that I've read the message so don't need to see it at the next login (although there is for all other new messages for customers at login).
 

plodr

Active Member
Oct 3, 2016
USA
#12
My bank always gives me a song and dance about switching from mailed statements to online. I have to click No Thanks every time. I prefer a printed copy so I can look back months and even years if I want to find the price of something or when something was purchased. In short, I want control over my bank information!
 

Kick

Active Member
Aug 12, 2014
Dorset, England, UK
Thread starter #14
Sorry Tony, we were getting a bit carried away - bank services in general and account security, particularly with on-line banking, are a natural development from any discussion on Trusteer Rapport and the problems it causes but perhaps beyond the focus of this thread. Bank issues may well deserve a thread of their own somewhere on this forum.
 
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